Backyard Bird Primer: Common Songs of the Northeastern US

I drew this children’s guide to birds for my adviser’s children a few years back.  It was super fun, and although the artwork is atrocious (this was drawn even before my Guide to the Northeastern Trees!), if you have children you might enjoy sharing it with them.  It’s a good way to learn your bird songs!

If you would like a pdf copy, here it is BirdBook PDF!  I am more than happy to share my terrible artwork.  🙂  (I also have a black and white version if you’d like a colouring book.)

Mnemonics for bird songs

Barn Swallow and Blue Jay

Bluebird and Cardinal

Carolina Wren and Cedar Waxwing

Black-capped Chickadee and Chipping Sparrow

Crow and Cowbird

Downy Woodpecker and Flicker

Goldfinch and Grackle

House Finch and House Sparrow

Junco and Kingfisher

Meadowlark and Mockingbird

Mourning Dove and Nuthatch

Oriole and Robin

Song Sparrow and Starling

Titmouse and Towhee

Turkey Vulture and Wood Thrush

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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24 thoughts on “Backyard Bird Primer: Common Songs of the Northeastern US

  1. Pingback: Amateur’s guide to the trees of Northeastern North America « standingoutinmyfield

  2. I love this! We’re in southeastern PA and have a few feeders in our backyard. My girls adore birds (their three favorites are cardinals, chickadees, and goldfinches). We spend a lot of time bird watching and yet none of us can identify bird songs.

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  8. Oh, this is delightful. I have nothing but a little stone courtyard, a porch and balcony looking at the next building. So far only a housefinch and a local squirrel to the feeder. Cannot wait to get out on the ridge-tops of Pennsylvania to catch some hawk migration. I’ve enjoyed my visit here. Thank you!

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