The Great Ocean Road

This road was built by Australian veterans after World War I.  It serves as a memorial and a tourist attraction, but it was also one of the first roads that allowed access throughout Victoria, along the coast.

It is an amazing testament to what men can achieve, even with “Construction done by hand; using explosives, pick and shovel, wheel barrows, and some small machinery, and was at times perilous, with several workers killed on the job; the final sections along steep coastal mountains being the most difficult to work on.”  (Source: Wikipedia)

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This is where the movie “Point Break” was filmed, according to our tour guide. (A quick internet search does not verify this point.)

IMG_9239 IMG_9233 IMG_9237IMG_9243Mel Gibson’s house!

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The only house that survived a large bush fire in the area. Any guesses as to why?

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Gorgeous beach vegetation, mostly sheoaks.

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The memorial to the veterans.

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You can see how the road was cut out of the perilous cliff faces in this photo.

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Victorian countryside.

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And these are the famous twelve apostles.

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More beachy vegetation.

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The twelve apostles are very famous and attract professional photographers from all over the world.

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Even pests are pretty sometimes.

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Unfortunately, this is where my camera died.

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One thought on “The Great Ocean Road

  1. Pingback: The Carnivorous Otway Snail and the Hyperbole of tour guides « standingoutinmyfield

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