Pretty little sweat bee

I’m pretty sure this is a male Halictus rubicundus…he’s on a greater willowherb flower (Epilobium hirsutum).

Halictus rubicundus
Halictus rubicundus
Pretty face
Halictus rubicundus
You can see how big the Epilobium pollen grains are on his back.

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Some photos of Syrphid flies

I’m trying to learn to love these little syrphid flies…look, I’m the first to admit that I haven’t always been fond of syrphid flies, but since moving to Ireland, I’ve had to learn to love them…sometimes they’re the only pollinators out and about here!

Here are some common syrphid flies I’ve seen this summer…mostly on Cat’s Ears (Hypochaeris radicata).

I think these are Syrphus ribesii
Syrphid Flies
Syrphid Flies
Syrphid Flies
The eyes of the females do not touch, while the male eyes touch at the top of the head.
Syrphid Flies
They are kind of pretty…sometimes
Syrphid Flies
Syrphid Flies
Yummy pollen all over her face
Syrphid Flies
Syrphid Flies
Syrphid Flies
Fuzzy!

I think this is Platycheirus albimanus
Syrphid Flies
Syrphid Flies
I really like the colour on this one!
Syrphid Flies
Ireland is great for dramatic lighting
Syrphid Flies
Drinking nectar?
Syrphid Flies
On Phacelia tanacetifolia
Syrphid Flies

Feather grass

I just discovered this new species I’m calling feather grass…what an interesting seed dispersal strategy it has!
😀
Feather grass

 

WILL there really be a morning?

Is there such a thing as day?

Could I see it from the mountains

If I were as tall as they?

Has it feet like water-lilies?

Has it feathers like a bird?

Is it brought from famous countries

Of which I have never heard?

Oh, some scholar! Oh, some sailor!

Oh, some wise man from the skies!

Please to tell a little pilgrim

Where the place called morning lies!

– Emily Dickinson

Invisible Visitors, by David Budbill

I’ve been traveling so much this year, this poem really resonated with me…just passing through, just passing through, just passing through…

Invisible Visitors

All through August and September

thousands, maybe

tens of thousands, of feathered

creatures pass through

this place and I almost never see

a single one. The fall

wood warbler migration goes by here

every year, all of them,

myriad species, all looking sort of like

each other, yellow, brown, gray,

all muted versions of their summer selves,

almost indistinguishable

from each other, at least to me, although

definitely not to each other,

all flying by, mostly at night, calling to each

other as they go to keep

the flock together, saying: chip, zeet,

buzz, smack, zip, squeak—

those

sounds reassuring that we are

all here together and

heading south, all of us just passing

through, just passing

through, just passing through, just

passing through.

– David Budbill

A small section of the Loowit trail

Loowit Trail
I didn’t have enough time to hike as much of the Loowit trail as I would’ve liked, but I did have some fun rambling about on the boulders of this small section of the trail. The full trail goes all the way around the base of Mt. St. Helens…it’s 28 miles round trip, so I suppose it might be possible to knock it out in one day, but it would be challenging. Most people backpack it and camp along the way (life goals!).
Loowit Trail
There’s a steep, short trail leading up to the Loowit trail from June Lake
Loowit Trail
Loowit Trail
Plenty of views of the mountain!
Loowit Trail
Loowit Trail
It’s always funny how the mountain looks different as you approach it
Loowit Trail
Rubble and ash from the eruption
Loowit Trail
Loowit Trail
Pretty
Loowit Trail
Loowit Trail

Seemingly endless rubble fields
Loowit Trail